Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Yema Cake

If you are like me and you always find yourself with tons and tons of leftover eggyolks and would like to find new ways to use them up, then this post is especially for you.

Yema cake is another one of those cakes that seem to be a hit among Filipinos. Its popularity is to the extent that the people of Metro Manila would literally flock to the source of the best version, over 140 kilometers away.  Looking at photos online, this cake appears to be very unappealing and sloppily done.  It looks as though it is drowning in its own runny icing! But, if something so plain-looking is attracting this much attention and praise, then it must be really, really good, right?

Image credit: L - Let's Talk, Let's Eat, Let's Wander; R - Rodillas Facebook page

The Spanish word 'yema' translates to 'eggyolk'.  In the Philippines, however, yema refers to a custard candy, evolving from the Spanish type of just mainly eggyolks and sugar to something more milky with the addition of condensed milk.

If you google for a yema cake recipe, everything you will find have the condensed milk/eggyolk combination for the filling and icing.  I'm sure that's delicious as well but I was told that the Rodillas yema icing was not the milky kind but instead was more eggy in taste, true to its Spanish origin.  The cake itself is a simple chiffon.

Armed with just that knowledge (and my leftover eggyolks), I experimented on my own yema cake.  (By now, surely you should know, cloning cakes is my kind of thing!)


My yema icing (which is also the filling) is made mostly from eggyolks, with some butter and a minimal amount of milk to give it more flavour and spreadability.  This type of spreadable yema is adapted from my aunties' filling recipe for another Filipino favourite, the Brazo de Mercedes.  As you can see from the photo above, the icing is like very bright, golden yellow.  Eggyolks here in Australia (as far as I have observed), whether they are from caged or from free to roam chickens, are very orange rather than pale yellow.



I am not definite if my cake is close to the Rodillas cake but one thing is sure...I did enjoy it!  The chiffon cake is of course, nothing new.  Yema on a cake, however, is a pleasant first for me. 


YEMA CAKE 

(Since this cake requires a lot of eggyolks, this recipe is only for a small 8" cake. Recommended pan is an 8x3 round or square.)

Ingredients:

Chiffon Cake:
{A}
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sifted cake flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/8 cup white sugar

{B}
1/4 cup corn/canola oil
4 egg yolks, from large eggs, at room temperature
1/3 cup water
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon lemon or lime extract

{C}
4 eggwhites
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar

{D}
3/8 cup white sugar

Procedure:
1. Preheat oven to 170 degrees Celsius. Line bottom of baking pan with parchment paper.  Do not grease pan. Do not use non-stick.
2. In a large bowl, combine {A} well. Add in {B}. Beat with electric mixer or by hand until smooth and well blended.
3. In a separate bowl, beat {C} on high speed until frothy. Gradually add in the sugar {D} and beat until stiff peaks are formed. Gradually and gently fold in egg whites into egg yolk mixture. Pour batter into baking pan.
4. Bake for about 45-50 minutes or until top springs back when lightly touched. Invert pan into wire rack immediately and cool completely.
5. To release cake from pan, carefully run a thin knife around sides of pan, then invert. For easier handling, wrap your cake very well in cling film, then refrigerate overnight before frosting.

Yema filling and icing:

Ingredients:
12 eggyolks **
1/2 cup melted butter, cooled
1/2 cup white sugar
1/4 cup + 2T evaporated milk
1 1/2  tsps vanilla extract

**Since eggyolks vary in size and use of small eggyolks may result to a runny icing, it is better to weigh them.  A large eggyolk is around 19 grams so use approximately a total of 228 grams.

Combine all the ingredients in a medium-sized heatproof bowl.  Set the bowl over a pan of simmering water and mix continuously with a whisk until quite thick but still of pourable consistency. This should not take too long.  It will thicken a bit more upon cooling.

To assemble cake:

You will also need grated cheese (as much as you want!) for topping.  Use a strong tasting cheese, if possible.

Slice your cake horizontally into two equal pieces.  Place one cake layer (top piece) on your cake board, cut side up. Spread a thin layer of yema over the cake.  Place the other cake layer over the bottom layer, bottom side up.  Frost the cake with the remaining yema then top with grated cheese.


Easy and yummy!

64 comments:

  1. Yum! I've been wanting to make this, thanks for posting the recipe, Corinne. Looks so good! ~Mela~

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  2. Wow! Can't wait to make this one for Easter Sunday! I just have one question..what kind of cheese did u use? Is it Filipino cheese? What if it's not available? Thank you so much for keeping sharing ur never ending ideas and thoughts and especially all the yummy recipes!! God bless you!!!,more power!!

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    Replies
    1. The kind of cheese is up to you. I just used cheddar cheese because it was what I had on hand. My recommendation though is to
      choose something strong tasting like aged edam or vintage cheddar.

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  3. I hope you could clone the custaroons too and leche puto:-) .thank you for sharing another yummy recipe corinne:-) your caramel cake is sinfully delicious:-)

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  4. thank you so much for all the cake clone recipes! they surely satisfied all my cravings! living abroad makes us long for all these yummy cakes back home. i'd like to request you to clone conti's mango bravo and max's caramel bar too! i haven't tried mango bravo myself, but looking at the photos online just makes my mouth water! max's caramel bar i can only taste whenever i visit Pilipinas...more power to you corinne!

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  5. Hi! This looks good. It reminds me of the yema candies I used to have as a kid. Have you made those before?

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  6. hi, corinne. i made this cake twice this week. the second one was more successful, even my grandma who doesn't like deserts loved it. i served it to family this lunch because everyone couldn't wait until merienda time.
    my only problem was that the filling was a tad thin (in both cakes) even though i cooked it for at least thirty minutes. the cakes ended up soaking a good amount of it. i'm thinking it's because the egg yolks were too small. the label on the egg tray read "large" but the yolks were tiny. if that happens again, maybe i'll throw in extra yolk or two or perhaps even add a teeny amount of cornstarch.
    all in all, however, it was delicious and enjoyable that my sister ate more than a third of it. i can send you photos if you want, btw.
    great recipe!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I lose count of my leftover eggyolks, I just weigh them to get the amount I need. One large eggyolk is around 19 grams. Maybe next time, you can use this weight as a guide. I would not add cornstarch if I were you. The consistency might change.

      Also, in my experience, the cooking time is not too long. Once the eggyolks look opaque and the mixture is like the consistency of condensed milk, I stop cooking. The icing still thickens up a bit upon cooling.

      Sure, send me photos. Thanks for trying the recipe out!

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    2. all right. no cornstarch it is. thanks for the weight tip!

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  7. I just have one question. How can I put parchment paper in the pan without greasing it? I think the parchment paper will move. Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. Use water. I've been doing it for a long time and have had no problems so far. Unless Corinne suggests against it. :D

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    2. Do you mean you use water so the parchment paper will stick? If it works for you then why not?

      Actually, here's a trick. Don't use parchment paper at all. Just sprinkle the bottom of the pan with a few drops of water then pour your batter straight in. Your cake will stick but do not worry, it will come out with a few taps.

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    3. Yeah. I wet my fingers then rub them against the bottom of the pan before placing parchment paper. Parchment won't slip and slide at all.

      Delete
  8. Hi Corrine! Can you upload videos as well! I love your recipes!

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    1. Aside from not having a decent video camera, I don't think I have time to make videos and all the editing that comes with it! I have been trying to take more step by step photos recently so I hope that suffices for now.

      Delete
  9. Hi Corinne! I am definitely going to try this one. I made leche puto and it was a blast! You are an angel! Thanks so much!

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  10. hi! did u use 2 8" pans for the cake batter?

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    Replies
    1. No, just one 3" high pan. I cut my cake in half.

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  11. You did not use condensed milk in yema filling?

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    Replies
    1. No, I didn't use condensed milk. Please read the entire blog post for explanation on why.

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    2. Thanks for the recipe. I'll try this one. :)

      Delete
  12. hi,mukang okay etong recipe mo ah, near to original, gawin ko eto next time, tanong ko lang, ang dami kasing eggyolks na kailangan, anu naman ang pwede kong gawin sa eggwhites? and nabasa ko sa thread dito about the weight of a large eggyolk is 14g, medyo maliliit kasi ang eggyolks dito sa KSA, is it safe na kunin ko na lang yung total ng weight ng eggyolks then multiply to 12 para makuha ko yung measurement mo (14g x 12pcs) ? nakakahinayang kasi kung masasayang lang... salamats... btw... i'll be doing your puto leche mamaya...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, mas maiigi na i-weigh mo nalang yung eggyolks. It's nineteen grams (hindi fourteen) per eggyolk.

      Pwede mo i-freeze ang eggwhites. Ginagamit ko kadalasan ito sa paggawa ng swiss meringue buttercream. Pwede ring lengua cookies, angel food cake o french macarons. Maraming ideas sa internet, paki-google nalang.

      Delete
  13. Hi corinne, i saw a comment above which is thesame as my experience, i cant seem to make the yema icing thicker, ive been constantly stirring it for more than 45 minutes but still almost watery, i added more milk and it became thicker but with cooked egg so i had to siff it first thats probably because its been on heat for so long. I must be doing something wrong

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As I have suggested with the other commenter, maybe you can weigh the eggyolks? I think the size of the eggyolks used really affects the thickness of the cooked icing, Generally, the eggs I use have large yolks.

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  14. Good morning! How do you measure 3/8 cup sugar?

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    Replies
    1. Don't you have a 1/8 measuring cup?

      3/8 cup is also the same as 6 tablespoons.

      Delete
  15. Hi corrine! May i ask what you mean about 2T evap milk, is it 2 tbsp? Thank you!

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    Replies
    1. Yes, "T" means tablespoon and 't" means teaspoon.

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  16. Hi Corinne! I am here in Perth WA and just wondering how come I haven't find any cake flour in the groceries? Where do you buy yours?

    TIA!

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    Replies
    1. There is only one brand - Lighthouse. It is labelled as Biscuit, Cake and Pastry plain flour (soft, low protein). Available in boxes of 1kg only. You can find it at Coles or Woolworths.

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  17. Hi Corrine! I made Yema Cake from your recipe and I had a problem. My cake is not even at the side. Starting from the middle, it became smaller upwards. Should I put parchment paper at the side or not? And my cake is not as tall as yours. The height of mine is just 1 and a half inch. What should I do? :( Help me.

    By the way, the cake is freaking delicous xD My family and I reaally love it xD

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Obviously, something went wrong with your cake but it's hard to tell what because I do not know how you made it. Did you follow the instructions to the letter? Did you use the correct baking pan? Did your cake rise then sink after?

      You shouldn't put parchment paper on the sides. Your cake needs to stick to the pan so it won't sink.

      Delete
  18. ms. corrine, i just made this now, toothpick test kasi ginawa ko... nung wala ng wet batter sa toothpick, nilabas ko na ng oven, pero yung ibaba is not brown, tapos nung nagcool down na completely, medyo moist yung top... ganun ba yun? o may mali akong nagawa? thanks, blessed new year to you and to your family

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    Replies
    1. Sometimes the top becomes "wet" because as the cake is upside down and releases heat, moisture builds up in the bottom. Trim the crust off and underneath should not be wet. Underbaked cakes sink so if your cake did not, then it must be cooked.

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  19. i made several kinds of this cake and ur recipe works the best for me, thnk u so much , it helps me a lot..

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  20. Made the cake today and it was a success! And sooo good! Thanks for the recipe😊

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  21. Thank u for sharing this recipe. Great help. I would like to ask lang po sana yung measurement ng evap milk 1/4 cup + 2 ??

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  22. Will it be okat if I use non stick pan? thats the only thing i have kasi.

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    Replies
    1. Sorry but you will not get a good result with a non stick pan. It is better to invest in a new pan rather than waste ingredients.

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  23. Hi corinne! I made thia today but my yema filling is not shiny like yours..hope you can help me! Tnx

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    Replies
    1. Maybe it was overcooked? Also, better to use icing when it is still a bit warm because as it cools, it tends to lose its shine especially when you spread it when it's become very thick.

      Delete
  24. Hi Ms. Corrine!

    Can I use a heavy sauce pan (using a very low fire) to cook the icing instead of heatproof bowl topped in simmering water? Will it affect the consistency of the icing? I am afraid that I will overcook the eggyolk and end up with a disaster. :(

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    Replies
    1. I would advice against that for the specific reason that you mentioned. This icing is made up mostly of eggyolks and the chances of overcooking them is rather high. You really need to use a very gentle heat.

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    2. Thank you for the advise.
      I have tried your version of caramel cake earlier.The chiffon went good but the icing, parang naoverpower yung lasa ng butter. I used Anchor unsalted butter. And siguro naovercooked ko yung mixture kaya nagthicken sya and hindi naachieve yung tamang consistency..Will try it again tomorrow. Hope it will be a success.. :-)

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    3. Good luck with that! The caramel icing tastes more like milk, not butter.

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  25. hi can i use this tecupe to make yema cupcaked?

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    1. I personally don't use chiffon cake recipes for cupcakes because they tend to sink but you can try.

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  26. hi Ms Corrine..is frosting is sweet using only 1/2 cup of sugar?..I saw some recipe they are using condensed milk..

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    1. This icing is not sweet. As I've explained in the post, this is more eggyolk that milk-based, that is why there is no condensed milk in the recipe.

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  27. I made this today. I was happy with the result. It tastes delicious. The cake is fluffy and soft. The filling is perfect for the cake. Similar taste to rodillas yema cake.. Thanks Ms. Corrine for the recipe.. ☺😊

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  28. Hi! Thank you for the recipe. I just made it tonight! My yema filling was a success, though i alternated the evap milk with full cream milk since it's the only available in my pantry. However, i followed the baking time of the chiffon and a little bit overbaked though it was not burnt. I'll just make adjustment next time. All in all, i love your recipe😊

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  29. Thanks for this recipe. I just made it today. I love the chiffon cake. However, the yema filling reminds me of pastry cream with the exception of the thickener of course. I was wondering, is this the same recipe you use for the yema cake that you sell? I'm really wanting to make a yema frosting that is not sweet, only very slightly. And if this is not the same yema, do you have the recipe in your ebook perhaps? I've been thinking of buying it.... thanks for your time!

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    Replies
    1. Yema literally means eggyolks and this is what this icing basically is. It is far different from pastry cream not only because it contains no thickener but because it has a lot more eggyolks and a lot less milk.

      When I started selling yema cake, I used the recipe here as is. As I continued to research on how yema cream/icing is made in Spain, I made changes. The recipe I am now using is neither on this blog nor in the eBook. (There is no yema cake in the eBook by the way.)

      Delete
  30. Hi Corinne, can I use the same yema filling recipe for brazo de mercedes? You mentioned that you adapted it from your aunt's brazo recipe. Thanks a lot!

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    1. This yema icing is a bit runny to be used as a filling for brazo de mercedes. I don't know how my aunts managed to thicken it without overcooking the eggs!

      Delete
  31. Hi Corrine! I just made your yema filling/icing..it taste great but mine is not shiny as yours and it looks like a pastry cream..

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  32. Hi Ms. Corrine. How can you make your yema cake frosting pipeable? Thanks!

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    1. You cannot make this yema icing pipeable. If you cook it longer to make it thicker, you will overcook the eggs.

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  33. Corinne, how do you prevent the icing from tasting raw without overcooking the eggs?

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    1. Hmm not sure how to answer your question. I cook this at a low heat so the water is barely simmering.

      I have since altered my yema icing recipe to be more like the yema cream in Spanish desserts. Have not shared that though.

      Delete
  34. I have been dumbfounded about the situation several times too. The icing always looks cooked, but the taste is reminiscent of raw eggs. I added some dayap juice, but it instead added a dayap taste. Haha!
    In any case, I think it could have been just me because there were no such comments from the family. They sill loved the whole thing.
    I altered your recipe too because I saw some how-to videos about yema candies from Spain...

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